“I Know the Face, but I Can’t Remember the Name”: Insight into Facial Recognition & Memory Loss in Older Adults

November 20, 2014

“I know the face, but I can’t remember the name,” is something we’ve all experienced before (i.e., recognition and remembrance of visual stimuli not syncing up with the related chunk of verbal memory). But where does this phenomenon originate in the brain? New research provides evidence that, for older adults, “motion cues” may play a [...]

Read the full article →

Older Adults Who “Use It” by Volunteering Are Less Likely to “Lose It”

November 20, 2014

The phrase “use it or lose it” has been uttered for years to humorously explain the physical and mental decline that can occur when individuals stop exercising and regularly engaging their mental faculties—especially in older age. Now recent research has expanded this umbrella to encompass the effects of inactivity related to working life as well. [...]

Read the full article →

Your Early Morning Caffeine Fix May Be Less Demented Than You Think

November 20, 2014

Ever question your sanity after paying five dollars for a latte? Many of us have. Indeed, it’s not news to anyone that many adults cite coffee as one of the essentials they need to get their mornings going. That said, recent research suggests that our willingness to stand in that long Starbucks line may be [...]

Read the full article →

Brain Game Claims: Fact or Fiction?

November 20, 2014

In light of the increasing popularity of brain training, or “brain games,” and the claims being made about them, the Stanford Center on Longevity and Berlin’s Max Planck Institute for Human Development commissioned a consensus report from nearly 70 scientists on the current state of research on brain training. The scientists were asked to evaluate [...]

Read the full article →

What Is the State of Public Long-Term Services & Support?

October 22, 2014

Recently, in response to a new initiative of the federal government for improving long-term services and support (LTSS), Dr. Stephen Kaye at the Institute for Health & Aging at University of California, San Francisco addressed the policy landscape in the United States surrounding issues facing individuals in need of such resources. This included a discussion [...]

Read the full article →

Predicting the Future: Researchers Eye New Early Predictor of Cognitive Decline

October 22, 2014

Evidence of Alzheimer’s Disease begins to appear in the brain well before clinical cognitive symptoms of the disease, which has led to the introduction of the term “preclinical Alzheimer’s Disease” to refer to individuals without cognitive impairment who aren’t showing any clinical symptoms of the disease. These individuals show signs of the amyloid plaques that [...]

Read the full article →

Want to Reduce Chronic Inflammation? Volunteer!

October 22, 2014

Inflammation is just a disease thing, right? And aren’t productive activities just ways that one may choose to spend one’s time? On the surface, there doesn’t seem to be any relationship between the two. However, new research looks into whether four different types of productive activity (employment, volunteering, attending meetings, and caregiving) may play a [...]

Read the full article →

Senior Sextistics

October 22, 2014

Believe it or not, in some circles, it’s still taboo to talk about sex. But it’s not hard to believe that there are basically no circles where people are eager to discuss sex among older adults. Nonetheless, sex in later life usually doesn’t stop entirely. Instead, older adults tend to experience a decline in previous [...]

Read the full article →

A Closer Look at Religion’s Role in Countering Depression

September 25, 2014

Depression is one of the most common mental health issues facing older adults, with around 20 percent of adults over 65 reporting being depressed. Additionally, researchers have suggested that older adults with major depression have double the risk of developing dementia compared with those who have never experienced major depression. This makes reducing depression among [...]

Read the full article →

Spousal Caregivers: Who’s the Frailest of Them All?

September 25, 2014

A number of studies have looked at the negative health consequences associated with spousal caregiving, but little attention has been paid to how the cognitive condition of the individual receiving care might impact health outcomes for the caregiver. Recently, a study in the Gerontologist looked into how care recipients with and without dementia might differently impact [...]

Read the full article →